Scotland Stirling Castle Emblem 184010993

Students who choose to study abroad in Stirling with API will choose from summer modules/classes offered over two four-week blocks. Each module consists of in-class and excursion components, giving students the opportunity to enjoy university teaching both in and out of the classroom. Modules are assessed by a combination of exam, essay, presentation, and fieldwork.

What's Included?

Highlights

Pre Departure Services

Advising

APIConnect Platform

Orientation Materials and Resources

Access to International Phone Plans

API Alumni Network

Social Networking

Scholarships

On Site Services

Airport Reception

On-Site Orientation

Housing

Resident Director

Tuition

Medical and Life Insurance

Excursions

Social and Cultural Activities

Welcome and Farewell Group Meals

Re-Entry Services

Re-Entry Materials and Support

Post-Program Evaluation

Transcript

Alumni Network and API Ambassador Program

View all opportunities and amenities

Application Requirements

  • Minimum 3.0 G.P.A.
  • Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors
  • Completed API Application
  • University Approval Form
  • One letter of recommendation
  • Official transcript
  • Copy of passport
  • Entry requirements: valid passport and supporting documents (Tier 4 visa required if participating in an internship)
Session Program Dates Program Cost Application Deadline Extended Application Deadline Payment Deadline
Summer 2 Jul, 2022 - Jul, 2022

Pricing Additional Information

Price is for one course. Students wishing to enroll in two courses will incur an additional $525 fee.

Apr 1, 2022 No Extension Apr 15, 2022

The prices listed below for the individual Summer 1 and Summer 2 sessions are for 3 semester credits (1 course). Students who are interested in earning 6 semester credits (2 courses) will incur an additional charge of $525.

The prices listed below for the Summer 1 & 2 combined session are for 6 semester credits. Students who are interested in earning 9 semester credits will incur an additional charge of $555. Students who are interested in earning 12 semester credits will incur an additional charge of $1,000.

API students participate excursions designed to help familiarize them with the culture and surrounding areas of their host city and country. The following is a listing of potential excursions for API Stirling programs. API may need to modify the excursions offered in a given term due to travel restrictions or health and safety concerns.

  • Edinburgh

    Edinburgh is Scotland’s capital city, with a skyline that is dominated by the impressive 12th century Edinburgh Castle, perched on an extinct volcano and occupied since the 9th-century BC (!). Edinburgh’s streets, whether in the medieval Old Town or the Georgian New Town, are steeped in history and are home also to the Scottish Parliament, The Palace of Holyrood House, the Royal Mile, the Royal Yacht Britannia and Arthur’s Seat. Edinburgh has a thriving cultural scene and you can also visit The Elephant House coffee shop where J.K. Rowling wrote the early Harry Potter books! Just outside Edinburgh is the enigmatic 15th-century Rosslyn Chapel, of Da Vinci Code fame, where practically every surface of the chapel is covered with stone carvings of figures and scenes and the atmosphere is one of deep mystery.

  • Glasgow

    Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and is home to an outstanding variety of museums, galleries and performance venues. Once the 2nd city of the British Empire and a major center of trade with the USA, Glasgow now wears its Victorian splendor with pride. Everything from impressionistic paintings to medieval armor is on display at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum. Other attractions are the Gallery of Modern Art, the social history museum Peoples Palace, Glasgow Cathedral and Necropolis, the bustling Merchant City, and the Provands Lordship.

  • Saint Andrews

    Saint Andrews is a stunning medieval city and home to the oldest university in Scotland where Prince William and Kate Middleton studied and met. It is also, of course, the home of golf. There are several golf courses in the town including the world famous Old Course and the town also has its own Golf Museum – great for those of us maybe not keen to play but who want to find out more about this famous sport! On top of all this is a stunning medieval cathedral and a beautiful ruined castle, which both played an important part in the reformation here in Scotland, surrounded by beautiful blue flag beaches!

  • Loch Ness and the Western Highlands

    Steeped in history and legend, the Highlands of Scotland is one of the last pristine regions of Europe. This is a land of high mountains, breathtaking islands, spectacular glens and deep, mysterious lochs. There are nature and wildlife to enjoy, imposing castles to explore and tales of folklore, heroes, and legends to savor. Also, there is Glenfinnan, home to the Glenfinnan Viaduct – most famous for its appearance in Harry Potter as the bridge that the Hogwarts Express crosses. And of course, last but not least, Loch Ness – home to the Loch Ness monster. People have claimed to have spotted the infamous monster for hundreds of years but you can make up your own mind!

What You’ll Study

TOTAL CREDITS - 3-6 credits per session (up to 12 total)

Students who choose to study abroad in Stirling with API will choose from summer modules/classes offered over two four-week blocks. Each module consists of in-class and excursion components, giving students the opportunity to enjoy university teaching both in and out of the classroom. Modules are assessed by a combination of exam, essay, presentation, and fieldwork.

There is an internship option available in the 2nd summer session. Students who are interested in this option must also participate in the summer 1 session, and are strongly encouraged to apply early, as placements fill quickly.

TRANSCRIPTS

API students receive their transcripts from the University of Stirling upon completion of their program.

  • Staff Bio Pic Mogan

    Rachel Mogan

    Rachel Mogan will be your Program Manager and help prepare you to go abroad!

    (she/her/hers)

  • GHN headshot

    Georgia Hall-Newell

    Georgia will be your Student Services Coordinator in Stirling and will be a resource for you while you are in Scotland!

Click Here to Find Classes

COURSE OFFERINGS

The summer modules/classes are offered over two four-week blocks. Each module consists of in-class and excursion components, giving students the opportunity to enjoy university teaching both in and out of the classroom. Modules are assessed by a combination of an exam, essay, presentation, and fieldwork. Courses at the University of Stirling are assigned credit based on the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF). Each Stirling module earns 10 SCQF credits or approximately 3 U.S. credits. Students are thus able to earn 6 U.S. credits (during a four-week block) or 9 to 12 U.S. credits (during an eight-week block).

Examples of the course syllabi are available from the API Scotland program manager upon request.

CREDIT INFORMATION

Summer students at the University of Stirling can earn 3 credits per course for a total of 3-12 U.S. semester credits over a four-eight week period.

Internship for International Summer School

The internship module places a student with a local employer for a four week placement where they will undertake a project of benefit to the business. Internships will be usually available in the following sectors: sport, environment, political, charity/not for profit sector and marketing.

The placements will enable students to not only acquire valuable experience, but also to develop networking skills and some knowledge of the UK labor market. It will also develop student confidence in the workplace and build their employability skills. Employers include large and small to medium sized companies in both the public and private sectors. Students will have the opportunity to reflect upon their development and experience throughout the module.

There will be a mix of classroom teaching sessions, review days and on-line tutorials, however, the core aspect of the module will be a work placement. It is estimated that each internship will include about 140 contact hours and about 10 classroom hours through the four week period. Students are supported by a mentor based in their placement organization and by a designated tutor from the Careers and Employability Service.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Crime and Justice in Scotland: The Criminal in Scottish Society

This module is designed to introduce students to the subject of Criminology through the lens of the Scottish Criminal Justice System. The module begins with an overview of the Scottish Criminal Justice System before examining the major avenues by which the public obtain information about crime – as victims of crime and from the media and official statistics. The module examines the processes that have developed our definitions of crime and the broader social and political context in which this crime occurs. In addition to this, the course provides the opportunity for students to engage in discussion with a Scottish Prison Service Warden, allowing a deeper understanding of punishment in Scotland and the incarceration of offenders.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

International Relations

This module explores contemporary issues and debates that shape world politics today. It starts by introducing International Relations (IR) theory before turning to two broad themes that dominate IR: conflict and peace. Key issues covered include nuclear weapons, private military companies, humanitarian intervention and failed states. Students will also apply the themes of conflict and peace to a case study of the Northern Ireland conflict exploring the key political developments and the transition to a post-conflict settlement. This module will also include a workshop that examines the use of wall murals to articulate conflict / post-conflict identity. This module includes a day trip visit to Belfast where students will undertake a historical/political tour of the city taking in the wall murals and other key sites linked to the Northern Ireland conflict. Students taking this module may incur a small additional charge for the trip to Belfast.

Language of Instruction: English   

Recommended US semester credits: 3  

Monsters and Vampires: The Impact of British Gothic on Contemporary Popular Culture

From sparkly vampires to blockbuster monsters, gothic tropes appear to be all-pervasive in contemporary culture. As Catherine Spooner claims in Contemporary Gothic (2006), like ‘a malevolent virus, Gothic narratives have escaped the confines of literature and spread across disciplinary boundaries to infect all kinds of media, from fashion and advertising to the way contemporary events are constructed in mass culture’. What this course aims to do is to introduce students to Gothic’s literary expression in the British nineteenth century, before exploring the many ways in which this dark heritage continues to affect contemporary cultural production. Focusing on three key texts from the nineteenth century, Frankenstein (1818), The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) and Dracula (1897), this class will discuss their adaptation, appropriation and influence on popular narratives such as those found in fiction, film, tv, fashion and music video.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Scottish History: The Jacobites

The module aims to provide students with an understanding of the origins, main features and impact of the Jacobite movement, while placing Scotland's experience of Jacobitism firmly within its wider British and European context. The themes we will examine include the Stuart monarchy in general and James VII in particular, the nature of the multiple monarchy, looking at relations between Scotland, England and Ireland, Highlands and Lowlands, early modern warfare, and international diplomacy. The module seeks to deepen historical and transferable skills already acquired or to assist students coming to history as a discipline for the first time in acquiring such skills.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland

The module aims to provide students with a thorough understanding of the phenomena of witchcraft belief and prosecution in Scotland between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. The focus of the module will be mostly on social and cultural themes but an understanding of the political, economic and religious context will be important.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Brief Encounters: An Introduction to Writing Short Stories

This module has been designed to help students realize their creative potential by producing original and stimulating short fiction. Teaching will consist of specialist workshops conducted by an expert in the field. In addition to engaging with practical aspects of craft and technique, students will learn how to create believable, compelling characters and how to make them live (and die!) on the page. They will also have the opportunity to visit sites of historic importance and natural beauty to inspire their writing.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Scotland the What? Contemporary Scottish Literature & Identity

For the past decade, Scotland’s national status has been ‘both dangled before us and tantalizingly withheld’ (poet Don Paterson). With attention focused on the question of independence, recent debates concerning Scottish culture and identity gain a heightened political charge. Literature has not only reflected but actively shaped such debate. In the year the new Scottish Parliament was established (1998), Christopher Whyte argued that ‘in the absence of elected political authority, the task of representing the nation has been repeatedly devolved to its writers’. But what influence have writers played in recent political change, and to what extent has Scottish culture escaped its own stereotypes?

This course examines the literary and political currents shaping contemporary Scottish identity, introducing students to key twentieth- and twenty-first century texts. We encounter and explain a range of cultural debates concerning language, class, democracy and nationhood, attending to the urgency as well as the complexity of recent Scottish writing.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Junkies and Jezebels: Scotland and Gender

Recent advances in feminist and LGBT+ liberation movements have had a visible and global impact on culture, literature, politics, and commerce. This module examines gender and sexuality in a Scottish context. As binary understandings of gender and sexuality are increasingly shown to be outdated and outmoded, developments in our understanding of gender and sexuality are making headlines and becoming a regular part of our daily discourse in both our social and working lives. This course enables students to apply their knowledge of identity politics to a dynamic range of relevant texts.

The texts in this module examine the decline of the traditional, industrialist, ‘hard man’ masculinities in Scotland. Through an exploration of dynamic, contemporary and highly acclaimed texts, this course examines broken masculinities, resistant femininities, and resurgent Scottish LGBT+ fictions. A select range of relevant secondary sources will accompany this exploration of primary literature, introducing students to iconic theorists, as well as relevant contemporary critics examining Scottish literature from a gendered perspective.

There will be optional opportunities to submit creative work as an alternative to an essay assignment, enabling students to demonstrate an understanding of the stylistic and thematic aspects of the course as creative practitioners.

Green Politics: Theory & Practice

This introductory module aims to provide students with an understanding of environmental issues and the key issues and dilemmas involved in addressing problems such as climate change and consumer behavior. We will evaluate the gaps between environmental policy intentions and reality. The module also helps students to navigate the multitude of concepts, ideologies,actors and political settings involved in environmental politics. Key areas this module will focus on include green political theory and sustainable development, the role of green political parties in the UK, corporations and green politics, green consumerism and environmental protest campaigns.

Language of Instruction: English    Course Level: Lower Division  

Recommended US semester credits: 3   Course Level: Lower Division  

View Syllabus   

Highlights
  • Ranked #1 in U.K. for welcoming international students, campus environment; #2 in U.K. for sports facilities; top 10 in U.K. for extra-curricular activities/societies; 15 in U.K. for library
  • Ranked #1 in Scotland, top 5 in U.K. for Criminology - Guardian University Rankings
  • Ranked #1 in Scotland, top 10 in U.K. for Media/Film Studies, Social Policy - Guardian University Rankings
  • Ranked #1 in Scotland, top 15 in U.K. for Education - Guardian University Rankings
  • Ranked #2 in Scotland, top 15 in U.K. for Sociology
  • Ranked 1st in Scotland and 8th in U.K. in The Times Higher Education "100 under 50" table, which ranks the world's best 100 universities under 50 years old
  • Scotland's "university of sporting excellence"
  • Internships available in summer 2 session (for credit)

API students are all housed in 4-7 bedroom apartment-style accommodations on campus. Each student will have their own single-occupancy bedroom along with a shared kitchen, dining, and living areas. Housing is self-catered. With the exception of those participating in the summer school, students will need to provide their own kitchenware (crockery, utensils, etc). Additionally, the university’s catering department offers superb value catering options on campus. Most flats have sinks in the bedrooms and all housing has shared shower and toilet facilities (summer students will have their own private bathrooms). All housing is fully networked, enabling residents to access the university’s computing resources, including internet. 24-hour concierge services are available on site. Bedding packs will be provided for all API students.

Stirling Student Housing 8719879741 O
Stirling Student Housing 8719879747 O
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